Uncategorized

St. Marys Hospital Members Ratify New 3-year Contract

180424_SMH_ratification vote passed

Leave a comment

SEIU St. Mary’s Contract Negotiations Summary

  • The duration of the contract is 3 years.
  • We cleaned up contract language to remove food service.
  • Along with Union Stewards, Leaders are also recognized in the contract in all applicable places.
  • Employees will be granted time off to attend Lobby Day.
  • The timeline to decline and awarded position went from 14 days to 7 days.
  • A full list of existing benefits was added to the contract so everyone is aware.
  • The Union Representative must notify the HR representative 48 hours before coming to the hospital whenever possible.
  • The Union Representative will give 2 weeks’ notice, instead of 6 days, to get employees released for union business.
  • The standard initiation fee no longer exists and was removed from the contract.
  • Maintained union pension.
  • Double time will be paid on the 7th day of a work week if an employee is scheduled or mandated during that seven days.
  • New Union Security language was added.
  • There will be new member orientation for new Union members on site the same day as the new employee orientation.
  • All Roman Numerals will be changed to regular numbers.
  • The Employer and Union agree to sit down and discuss overtime issues in Surgical Services.
  • The Employer and Union will create a side agreement regarding i-pad carrying straps for janitors in Environmental Services.
  • 20-year step was added to the wage scale.
  • Wages:
    • Year 1: 1.5% for years 0-9; 1.75% for years 10-19; 2% for 20+ years
    • Year 2: 2%
    • Year 3: 2%

If you have any questions, please ask a member of your elected bargaining team or ask an organizer at the ratification vote. We will be voting on the contract on Tuesday, April 24th from 7am-7pm in Domitilla M-144.

Comments Off on SEIU St. Mary’s Contract Negotiations Summary

Statement From Home Care Worker After Minnesota Court of Appeals Rules in Favor of Home Care Workers’ Union

The ruling is the latest in a series of losses for anti-union groups. Workers remain committed to addressing care crisis and improving lives of workers and families across Minnesota

Saint Paul — On Tuesday a three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals affirmed the Bureau of Mediation Services (BMS) dismissal of a union-decertification effort by a group calling itself “MNPCA” in December 2016, working in collaboration with the right-wing think tank the Center of the American Experiment. It is the latest in a string of losses for the anti-union organizations fighting to roll back the gains won by unionized home care workers over the last four years. In response to this latest court victory for workers and for the seniors and people with disabilities who receive care and families across Minnesota fighting to address the care crisis in our state, Anoka home care worker and elected union Vice President Corey Van Denburgh released the following statement:

Somali-HomeCareWorkers“Over the last few years we have made some crucial gains for home care workers and the people we serve. It’s a far cry from all the change that’s needed – wages are still far too low and there’s no health insurance for our jobs, for example – but still, we’ve made important progress in the short period of time since we voted to unionize. We’ve won sick pay for the first time, raised the wage floor by $3/hour, won free access to trainings, won over $150,000 in back-pay awards for workers who were underpaid, built an online matching registry to help home clients find the workers they need, and established time-and-a-half pay for holidays, among other gains.  Through these accomplishments, we are finally beginning to address the severe care crisis in our state, which has only been getting worse for years because of the low pay and lack of benefits provided for this important work.

“I am relieved and happy that this latest court case was ruled in our favor, as so many others have been over the last few years. The first two lawsuits trying to take away our union were filed a month before our union election, way back in the summer of 2014, and we have been under nonstop legal and public assault by anti-union groups ever since. As home care workers and people who receive home care services, we resolved to never let these extremist attacks stop us from making progress for the people of Minnesota, nearly every one of which will need home care services at some point in our lives.

“We have a lot of work left to do to address the state’s care crisis. Big-money groups fighting for years to tear down what we have won so far is a tragic misuse of time and energy. As someone who’s done home care work for over ten years and also as someone who has family members who receive care, I believe we should all be united as Minnesotans in working towards solutions to fix the care crisis. Whether Democrat or Republican, we all have been or will be impacted by the shortage of caregivers because of low pay and lack of benefits, so I hope we can put these divisive court cases and anti-union attack campaigns behind us. Let’s come together to make sure every Minnesotan can get safe, quality care and stay in their home with their loved ones.”

Comments Off on Statement From Home Care Worker After Minnesota Court of Appeals Rules in Favor of Home Care Workers’ Union

Locked Out Mayo Albert Lea Workers Stay Strong, Will Celebrate Holidays With Families Despite Mayo’s Christmas Lockout

Albert Lea, Minn – Workers with hundreds of years of service to the Albert Lea hospital continue to be out in the cold because of Mayo’s Christmas lockout. The workers went on a one-day ULP strike on Tuesday in the fight for good jobs and quality rural healthcare. When they attempted to return to work on Wednesday they were blocked from returning and locked out over Christmas. They picketed the rest of the week, joined by countless elected officials and union & community supporters. There will be no picketing over the weekend and Christmas as workers will spend time with their families. The group will return to work at 6am on Tuesday, Decem25626180_10155666844281928_1945528603961694497_ober 26th.

“We refused to let Mayo’s locking us all out on Christmas break our spirit. I am so proud that our group is standing strong for what is right. We haven’t wavered one bit, and we are as committed as ever to winning this fight for good jobs and good healthcare. It feels good that our union and community made sure everyone was taken care of, and we are going to stick together and continue our fight for what is right,” said Heather Olson, who has worked for 12 years as a housekeeper at Mayo.

While Mayo kicked the group of mothers, fathers and grandparents out in the cold, their union and community jumped to stand with them and ensure they would not miss a paycheck during Mayo’s Christmas lockout. The two sides will have a bargaining session on December 28th in Albert Lea after Mayo finally agreed to sit back down with the workers.

“After a year of not moving an inch, we were surprised to see Mayo telling reporters they were so interested in negotiating with us once they locked us out over Christmas,” said Justin Yost, who has worked in the utilities department for 14 years. “We will see next week if their actions match their words. The one thing we know is that all of us who were kicked to the curb by Mayo are stronger and more united than ever in fighting for good jobs and good healthcare. We don’t make $2.8 million per year like Mayo CEO Dr. Noseworthy, so our family’s futures are depending on it.”

Mayo’s decision to choose to respect temporary workers from out of the community over long-term employees who have lived in Albert Lea for decades was another instance of the misplaced values Mayo continues to show as they work to undermine good jobs and roll back the healthcare in rural Minnesota, all in the name of more profits and higher executive pay.

Despite Mayo’s cold shoulder to workers, many of whom have decades of experience making sure the hospital is run well for patients, the workers who have been locked out expressed gratitude for the support from elected officials, community members and other unions who have joined them on the picket line and supported in numerous other ways.

 To reciprocate the support, union members have collected toys and food and will be delivering them to children in need the week of Christmas.

“Just because Mayo is treating people in Albert Lea this way doesn’t mean we need to stoop to that level as well. This week has made clear that our community can and must stick together if we have a chance of winning the jobs and healthcare we deserve. We want to give back just a little, and we will use the Christmas season as a chance to support our fellow Albert Lea residents by sharing with those less fortunate than we are,” said Dave Larson, who has worked doing utilities at the hospital for 10 years. “We hope Mayo uses this holiday season to look in the mirror and decide if in 2018 they want to continue to be the kind of place that locks out hard-working employees, or if they want to be an employer that listens and meets people in the community halfway.”

###

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota

Comments Off on Locked Out Mayo Albert Lea Workers Stay Strong, Will Celebrate Holidays With Families Despite Mayo’s Christmas Lockout

Mayo Clinic Locks Out Workers Over Christmas, Many of the Workers Have Decades of Service to Mayo and the Community

Albert Lea, Minn — On Tuesday, December 19th, hospital workers at Mayo Clinic Albert Lea went out on the first ever one-day ULP strike at Mayo Clinic. When the workers returned to go back to work on Wednesday morning at 6am, Mayo management and security blocked them from entering, thereby locking out the 79 people who work as certified nursing assistants (CNAs), housekeepers, sterile processing and in utilities and materials management for seven days, including Christmas. Mayo backed down on their lockout threats for the the 2nd bargaining unit of six skilled maintenance workers.
DRfQFOOVoAUtn83.jpg-largeCharlotte Nelson-Schocker, who has worked at Mayo Clinic for 28 years doing materials management, expressed the shock and frustration felt by workers who were being locked out over Christmas.
“This makes me mad, sad and frustrated. We have given so much to Mayo, and now that we stood up for what is right for workers and our community, management have chosen to lock us out over Christmas,” said Neslon-Schoker. “I can’t believe it has come to this. We won’t stop fighting for what is right. I am so happy to have such amazing support from our union and community. The support means that even though Mayo has locked us out, we know we aren’t alone in our fight for good jobs and quality healthcare.”
More plans for the week will be announced today, with locked out workers speaking out at 11am.
###

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota

Comments Off on Mayo Clinic Locks Out Workers Over Christmas, Many of the Workers Have Decades of Service to Mayo and the Community

Albert Lea Hospital Workers Strike Mayo Clinic for First Time Ever

Hundreds picket as part of one-day strike, with workers supported by community members, multiple Gubernatorial candidates and other elected officials

Strikes comes as workers and community are fighting for good jobs and quality rural healthcare in face of #MayoGreed 

 

Albert Lea, Minn — Hospital workers at Mayo Clinic Albert Lea walked off the job on a one-day Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) strike this morning at 6am. It is the first strike in the history of Mayo Clinic, and comes after countless bargaining sessions where the workers strived to find a compromise with Mayo despite Mayo’s insistence on undermining the security of the working families. The workers voted overwhelmingly to authorize their one-day Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) strike late last month. The historic action comes as Mayo continues to demand changes that would undermine good jobs in the community and further the erosion of rural healthcare in southern Minnesota. Workers were joined by elected officials, including multiple candidates for Governor, other elected officials, and unions who shared their support for the workers. (Statements of support from elected officials and supportive unions to be sent out after 11am rally)

 
rs_Albert_Lea_Mayo_HCMN_strikeSheri Wichmann, who has worked in Sterile processing for 18 years
, shared why hospital workers are out on strike today.

“We are out on strike today because it is insulting that Mayo has treated us and our community this way. We are committed to our job and our community, and all we’re asking for is that Mayo recognizes our value. We care deeply about what happens as we are not just employees, but patients at this hospital,” said Wichmann. “We are not asking for the world, just a contract that is fair so we can feel some security for our families. We hope this will make Mayo realize they need to come to the table and negotiate in good faith.”

Since the vote, Mayo has threatened their employees with a seven-day lockout if they follow through with their legally-protected right to strike, a lockout that would mean workers with hundreds of years of service to Mayo patients would be locked out over Christmas. It comes during a time when Mayo’s revenues last year reached over $5 billion and Mayo’s CEO Dr. Noseworthy saw a 11% pay increase to $2.8 million per year.

Perry Jensen has worked at the hospital for 20 years in the utilities department and shared why he joined his co-workers in going on strike, even in the face of threats from Mayo.

“I’m going on strike because I am disappointed in Mayo’s ‘my way or the highway’ bargaining. It’s hard to feel valued or appreciated with what they are offering us and what they are proposing to take away,” said Jensen. “It feels like there isn’t the concern for us as employees and community members like there used to be. They won’t budge at all and want to force us to take what they want without sitting down and bargaining. It is a slap in the face. This was always a good place to work, but it is turning more into a corporate feel. I hope this strike makes them realize all we want is for them to sit down and bargain with us for what is fair for everyone.”

Joining striking workers were community members like Jeanine Anderson who shared support for the workers fighting for good jobs and quality rural healthcare.

“As a major employer here, Mayo sets the standard for jobs and the decisions they make about employment have a direct and immediate impact on this community,” said Jeanine Anderson, who worked as a manager at Mayo for 37 years before recently retiring. “The workers out here exemplify everyone in our community who depends on Mayo for good, secure jobs and quality healthcare. People come from around the world to be treated at the Mayo clinic, but our community’s needs are being thrown by the wayside. We are standing with the workers because our community needs to have a voice or we will lose out even more.”

The striking workers included the general group bargaining unit, consisting of 79 members who work as certified nursing assistants (CNAs), housekeepers, sterile processing and in utilities and materials management, who have been bargaining for over a year. Joining the larger group are six skilled maintenance workers who have been without a contract for over two years.

###

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

Comments Off on Albert Lea Hospital Workers Strike Mayo Clinic for First Time Ever

Mayo Albert Lea Hospital Workers to File 10-day Notice for 1-day ULP Strike, Set Dec. 19th as Strike Date

Skilled maintenance workers vote to join general group who already voted to strike, escalating the fight against #MayoGreed

Union Expresses Concern Over Mayo Threats Around Christmas Lockout

ALBERT LEA, MINN — SEIU Healthcare Minnesota is filing a 10-day notice of intent to hold an Unfair Labor Practice (ULP) strike at Mayo Albert Lea Hospital on Tuesday, December 19th.

The notice comes as the skilled maintenance workers who have been without a contract for over two years voted to join the general group also represented by SEIU who voted overwhelmingly to authorize a 1-day strike in late November. The votes come as Mayo in effect continues to demand steps backwards for working families as part of their evidently ongoing devaluation of rural healthcare. The general group bargaining unit includes 79 members who work as certified nursing assistants (CNAs), housekeepers, sterile processing and in utilities and materials management, providing essential services to community members who utilize the hospital. There are six skilled maintenance workers. 11037559_10153068860841928_2591725194101681896_n

Marlene Baseman has been a housekeeper at the hospital for over 27 years. As the strike date was announced, she shared her vote to strike was because after nearly three decades she has never felt so insecure or invisible at the hospital.

“I wish Mayo would appreciate our community and the people who keep the wheels turning in the hospital. Mayo’s actions affect everyone in our community, so that is why I’m willing to take this stand,” said Baseman. “What frustrates me is that at the bargaining table we have been willing to give and give and give, and when it is Mayo’s turn to compromise, they haven’t given an inch. They seem to want to throw away all of what we have now. They offer us pennies and cut back at our hospital while we see them spending big bucks in other places.”

Baseman also highlighted the changes at the hospital in recent years.

“It seems like they have no regards for people who aren’t executives. We feel like we are disposable to them,” Baseman continued. “We have to stand up for ourselves and our community. We won’t cave because we are fighting for what is right.”

Nate Johnson is an 18-year plant operation engineer at the hospital with the skilled maintenance bargaining unit that voted Wednesday to join the 1-day ULP strike as Mayo continues to demand the ability to subcontract these jobs.

“I voted to strike because we want real job security to be able to provide for our families. Job security means loyalty both ways, and right now we aren’t seeing loyalty back from Mayo. We reached across the bargaining table and agreed to much of what they asked from us, but now the bar has moved and they are demanding the ability to subcontract away our jobs,” said Johnson. “We have seen that Mayo will subcontract an entire department by what they did to the food service workers last year. The rules changed when we saw that happen. We think we aren’t that far away from a deal if Mayo would be willing to meet us halfway and stop demanding the ability to outsource our jobs.”

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota President Jamie Gulley shared how this fight is about basic respect for the people who work at the hospital and live in the community.

“Families in Albert Lea are simply fighting for good jobs and a commitment from Mayo to show that they value the Albert Lea community. For skilled maintenance workers, they have been without a contract for two years, and the general group for over a year. Mayo continues to insist on rolling back protections for workers and won’t budge on their demands to strip basic security and respect from people who have dedicated decades of experience to their community hospital. It is a slap in the face to the whole community,” said Gulley. “Mayo has shown no intention of meeting halfway on anything. Mayo’s ‘our way or the highway’ attitude have made it clear that working families have little choice but to stand up and fight back.”

After the general group strike vote was held the week before Thanksgiving, Mayo sent an email to staff threatening to lock out workers for seven days if they held their one-day strike. This aggressive move was seen by the union as clearly meant to be a threat to stop workers at the hospital from making their voices heard through their legally-protected right to strike.

“It is very troubling that Mayo decided to causally threaten employees with a Christmas lockout. I know working people, and the whole Albert Lea community, won’t be intimidated by threats from Mayo executives. The workers and the community are united for what is right. Over the last few years it has become crystal clear that Albert Lea workers, patients and community members are ready and willing to fight for good jobs and good healthcare in our community. It is time Mayo actually listens to families in Albert Lea instead of apparently only focusing on their bottom line while sitting in their executive suites.”

###

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

Comments Off on Mayo Albert Lea Hospital Workers to File 10-day Notice for 1-day ULP Strike, Set Dec. 19th as Strike Date

Election Day is November 7th!

Election Day! election 2017 web image

Tuesday, November 7th is election in cities, counties and school boards around the state of Minnesota. We are proud to report that 5 SEIU members are running for office this year! When workers like us get engaged in the political process we can make a real difference in the lives of our co-workers, our families and our communities. Wherever you live and whoever you plan to support in the elections- don’t forget to vote!

For a full list of SEIU endorsed candidates, to find your polling location or information about how to register to vote click here: seiumnballot.org

Comments Off on Election Day is November 7th!

Morrison – Food Services

EMPLOYER: Morrison

CONTRACTS
Morrison Contract 7.1.2017-6.30/2022

Internal Organizers:

Comments Off on Morrison – Food Services

UNSTOPPABLE: 2017 Member Convention and Leadership Assembly

SEIU Healthcare Minnesota leaders and members from across the state convened for two days of learning and to set the course of IMG_5435 IMG_5460 IMG_5731 IMG_5924 IMG_5960our Union. On Friday, September 15, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota leaders spent the day at various workshops. In these workshops members learned about organization equity and inclusion; examined our political future in Minnesota; discussed new and innovative ways that we can create member to member power within our Union and; explored the various ways that laws have been implemented around the country to destroy unions and ways that we can counteract them to continue to be a Union that sets standards and wins for members. Throughout the day SEIU leaders made commitments both to themselves, fellow members and their communities, which included: personally commit to speaking out against bigotry and discrimination of all kinds; Commit to active roles in electing pro-worker and pro-Minnesotan candidates in 2018; make personal leadership commitments to strengthen our Union and our members.

On Saturday, September 16th the fourth annual SEIU Healthcare Minnesota Member Convention was held. Throughout the  IMG_6586 morning, three resolutions were presented and voted on that shaped the course our Union will take over the coming year. These resolutions included: the Midwest Initiative, UNSTOPPABLE: member to member engagement, and a sanctuary union. Click here for a copy of the full resolutions. IMG_6303Additionally, a change to the dues structure was proposed, and was passed by IMG_6230members. Over the past year SEIU members and leaders have been exploring what happened when other unions were not prepared for open shop/dues check-off, and other anti-worker laws and how important a dues structure change is needed.The changes to our dues structure will help us to be better prepared for the uncertain political climate. For a copy of the approved dues proposal changes, go here.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Comments Off on UNSTOPPABLE: 2017 Member Convention and Leadership Assembly